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Grad Catalog

Educational Leadership and Foundations

501 Education Building
(915) 747-5300

CHAIR: Jorge Descamps
PROFESSORS EMERITI: Herbert K. Heger, John B. Peper
GRADUATE FACULTY: Brooks, Daresh, Johnston, Mendez, Navarro, Pacheco, Rincones, Schulte, Sorenson
DOCTORAL FACULTY: Brooks, Daresh, Johnston, Mendez, Navarro, Pacheco, Rincones, Schulte, Sorenson, Staudt
VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Cortez

The Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations offers three graduate degrees: I) a M.Ed. in Educational Administration with focus on K-12 administration or leadership in higher education; II) a M.A. in Education with focus on educational leadership in higher education which includes writing a thesis: and III) an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Administration. In addition to these degrees the department offers course work leading to Texas certification in the areas of : 1) School Principal, and 2) School Superintendent. For additional information, see our website: http://academics.utep.edu/edleadership.

 

I.  M.Ed. in Educational Administration

Students who wish to pursue graduate study directed toward developing leadership knowledge and skills may pursue a master’s in educational administration with focus on: A) K-12 school administration or B) leadership in higher education.

 

A.  Focus on K-12 Administration

The 36 credit hour Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) degree program in Educational Administration with emphasis on K-12 administration is designed to meet the needs of students seeking to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to becoming effective K-12 educational leaders. The program requires completion of a set of Foundation courses, General Administration courses, and Specialized Preparation courses.

 

Foundation Courses: All Foundation Courses must be taken prior to completing courses at the next level. All four courses will be offered every term throughout the academic year: EDAD 5310 Administrative Leadership; EDAD 5312 Instructional Leadership; EDAD 5340 School-Community Leadership; EDRS 5307 Data-Based Decision Making

 

Advanced Administration Courses: The Advanced Administration Courses will be completed by all students admitted into the program. Prerequisites for registration will be successful completion of at least three of the four Foundation Courses. The fourth Foundation Course may be in progress while the student registers for Advanced Administration courses. These courses include: EDAD 5314 School-Based Budgeting; EDAD 5342 Educational Law; EDAD 5345 Educational Leadership in a Diverse Society; EDAD 5348 Administration of School Personnel and Services.

 

Specialized Preparation Courses: The Specialized Preparation Courses may be completed while the student is also enrolled in one or more of the Advanced Administration Courses. These courses include: EDAD 5311 Curriculum Renewal, EDAD 5346 Educational Program Planning and Evaluation and EDAD 5352 Integrative Instructional Leadership and Professional Development. Students also take three hours from: SPED 5320 Historical and Legal Basis in Special Education or BED 5331 Bilingual/Bicultural Curriculum Design and Development. The purpose of these course offerings is to enable students without sufficient background and/or experiences to better understand major issues, trends, and practices associated with school administration in the areas of Special Education and Bilingual Education.

 

Exit Portfolio: Students will present a portfolio containing relevant and practical administrative-based material which includes a current resume, the Administrative Skills Assessment results (completed during EDAD 5310), an Educational Platform (completed during EDAD 5312), a community analysis paper (completed during EDAD 5340), along with other coursework activities as associated with the Learner-Centered Standards for Principals in Texas. The portfolio will be reviewed by faculty members and local expert school administrators to determine whether the individual student has demonstrated sufficient academic growth to warrant the granting of a Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) degree in Educational Administration.

Students enrolled in the M.Ed. program may additionally seek admission into the Principal Preparation Program which culminates with principal certification in the state of Texas. (See section on Principal Certification.)

 

B.  Focus on Higher Education Leadership

The M.Ed. degree program in Educational Administration with focus on leadership in higher education is designed to meet the needs of students seeking to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to becoming effective educational leaders in higher education institutions. The program requires the following courses:

 

Foundation Courses: All three Foundation Courses must be taken prior to completing courses at the next level and will be offered every term throughout the academic year: EDAD 5310 Administrative Leadership; EDAD 5312 Instructional Leadership; and

EDAD 5340 School-Community Leadership

 

Higher Education Courses: All students enrolled in the M.Ed. program with focus on higher education will complete 21 semester hours in higher education. Prerequisites for registration will be successful completion of the three Foundation Courses. Students enroll in EDAD 5390 Introduction to Higher Education; EDAD 5391 History of Higher Education; EDAD 5393 Higher Education Law; and EDAD 5394 Higher Education Governance; and take three courses from: EDAD 5345 Educational Leadership in a Diverse Society; EDAD 5346 Educational Program Planning and Evaluation; EDAD 5385 Ethics of Leadership in Education; EDAD 5386 Educational Policy Development; and EDAD 5397 Student Development Theory.

 

Research Courses: The following Research Courses may be completed while the student is also enrolled in one or more of the Advanced Higher Education Courses: EDRS 5305 Educational Research and Statistics and EDRS 5306 Qualitative Research.

 

Exit Portfolio. Students will present a portfolio containing relevant and practical administrative-based material which includes a current resume, the Administrative Skills Assessment results (completed during EDAD 5310), an Educational Platform (completed during EDAD 5312), a community analysis paper (completed during EDAD 5340), along with other coursework activities. The portfolio will be reviewed by faculty members to determine whether the individual student has demonstrated sufficient academic growth to warrant the granting of a Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) degree in Educational Administration.

 

II.  Master of Arts in Education

The Master of Arts degree in Education is a college-wide degree designed for students specializing in education who wish to pursue research and to continue studies beyond the master's degree. The department offers a M.A. in Education with focus on educational administration and leadership in higher education.

 

Focus on Educational Administration and Higher Education Leadership

The M.A. in Education with focus on educational administration and leadership in higher education requires the following courses which are taken in the same order as in the M.Ed. with focus on leadership in higher education:

 

Foundation Courses: EDAD 5310 Administrative Leadership; EDAD 5312 Instructional Leadership; and EDAD 5340 School-Community Leadership.

 

Higher Education Courses – All students enrolled in the M.A. in Education program with focus on higher education will complete 15 semester hours in higher education. Students enroll in EDAD 5390 Introduction to Higher Education; EDAD 5393 Higher Education Law; and EDAD 5394 Higher Education Governance and take two courses from: EDAD 5345 Educational Leadership in a Diverse Society; EDAD 5346 Educational Program Planning and Evaluation; EDAD 5385 Ethics of Leadership in Education; EDAD 5386 Educational Policy Development; and EDAD 5397 Student Development Theory.

 

Research Courses: Students enroll in EDRS 5305 Educational Research and Statistics; EDRS 5306 Qualitative Research.

 

Thesis Courses:  A thesis and oral defense must be satisfactorily completed to meet the M.A. in Education degree requirements. Students enroll EDAD 5398 Thesis Research; and EDAD 5399 Thesis Writing.

 

Admission Requirements for the M.Ed. and M.A. in Education Degrees

Students seeking admission to the M.Ed. and the M.A. in Education must complete the following prior to the semester in which they first plan to enroll. Application deadlines for the department may differ from those of the Graduate School.

  • Unconditional admission into the M.Ed. and M.A. in Education degree programs requires the following:

a. Application for admission to the Graduate School;

b. Completion of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university;

c.  Attainment of an undergraduate cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.00; or

d. Attainment of an undergraduate GPA of no less than 3.00 in all upper division undergraduate coursework;

e. Evidence of successful completion of at least 12 semester hours of coursework in upper division undergraduate coursework in professional education;

f.   A written statement by the applicant describing personal and professional goals as related to the focus of the M.Ed. and M.A. programs in Educational Administration.

 

  • Conditional admission may be granted to applicants who have been denied unconditional admission to the program. The Admissions Review Committee of each program will consider and make recommendations to admit applicants conditionally. Terms of any conditional admittance will be determined on an individual basis, and will be specified in writing to the Graduate School and to the applicant.

 

Non-Degree Programs

In addition to the M.Ed. and M.A. in Education degree programs, the department offers coursework leading to Texas certification in the areas of: 1) School Principal, and 2) School Superintendent. The Principal Certification Program is available to students who have completed the M.Ed. in Educational Administration in the department as well as to students with a master’s degree from another related field.

 

Principal Certification Program for Students with M.Ed. in Ed. Administration

A separate application and review process will be completed by those, who after completing a M.Ed. in Educational Administration in the department seek admission into the program. When applying to the Principal Certification Program students must submit three professional letters of recommendation and have 1) a valid Texas teaching certificate, 2) a minimum of two years teaching experience, and 3) a passing score (80% or greater) in the TExES Qualifying Examination. The application and review process will occur during the final semester of coursework as listed in the student’s approved Plan of Study. The review is based on the standards-based Exit Portfolio presentation which serves as a culmination of learning experiences during the Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) degree program.

The Principal Certification Program requires two additional internship courses and culminates with certification as a school principal in the state of Texas. The internship courses are: EDAD 5375 School Management Internship I and EDAD 5376 School Management Internship II.

 

Principal Certification Program for Students without M.Ed. in Ed. Administration

Students who do not have a M.Ed. in Educational Administration from the department and who wish to pursue principal certification must apply to Graduate School for admission to Principal Certification Program and then submit to the Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations (EDLF): 1) Documentation of Master’s degree in Education or related field; 2) Documentation of two years of classroom teaching experience in an accredited school; 3) Three letters of recommendation from school or central office supervisors; 4) A statement of vision and personal belief about the Principalship. A review process and admission recommendation by the Principal Preparation Program Committee will be completed prior to admission into the program (Conditional Admission).

 

Foundation Courses: The Principal Certification Program requires that all students complete the four Foundation Courses: EDAD 5310 Administrative Leadership; EDAD 5312 Instructional Leadership; EDAD 5340 School-Community Leadership; EDRS 5307 Data-Based Decision Making. Upon completion of the Foundation Courses, students must score at least 80% in the TExES Qualifying Exam in order to be classified as Unconditionally Admitted. If not successful in the Qualifying Exam students may continue taking courses as Conditionally Admitted.

Students are expected to complete the following program courses, or show evidence of competence in the required standards for principal certification through previous coursework and/or professional experiences consistent with the specifications established in the Texas State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC 21.046) policy:

 

General Administration Courses: EDAD 5314 School-Based Budgeting; EDAD 5342 Educational Law; EDAD 5345 Educational Leadership in a Diverse Society; and EDAD 5348 Administration of School Personnel and Services.

 

Specialized Courses: EDAD 5311 Curriculum Renewal; EDAD 5346 Educational Program Planning and Evaluation; EDAD 5352 Integrative Instructional Leadership and Professional Development; plus 3 hours from: SPED 5320 Special Education – Historical and Legal Basis or BED 5351 Bilingual/Bicultural Curriculum Design and Development.

 

Internship: After scoring (>= 80%) in the TExES Qualifying Exam, which is a prerequisite to the internship, students enroll in EDAD 5375 School Management Internship and EDAD 5376 School Management Internship II.

 

Exit Portfolio: Additionally, students develop as part of the foundation core courses and throughout the program a professional portfolio reflective of the TExES domains and competencies for principal certification.

After completing all the program requirements students are able to register for the TExES Principal Exam (068).

 

Superintendent Certification Program

The Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations offers a Superintendent Preparation/Certification Program. Students who wish to pursue superintendent certification must apply to the Graduate School for admission and then submit to the Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations: 1) Documentation of master’s degree, 2) Documentation of Texas principal certification (prior to 1996 or mid-management administrator 1973 program), and 3) Three letters of recommendation from school or central office personnel. A review process and admission recommendation by the Superintendent Preparation Program Committee will be completed prior to admission into the program.

The program is designed as a follow-through educational leadership experience to the principal preparation program to prepare students for 1) executive level positions in school districts, and 2) for the TExES Superintendent Exam (064). Students enrolled in the program are required to complete the following courses: EDAD 5380 School Organization, Reform and Renewal, EDAD 5382 Educational Finance, EDAD 5384 Educational Facilities Management, EDAD 5386 Educational Policy Development, EDAD 5388 Central Office Administration, and EDAD 5389 School Superintendent Internship. Superintendent Certification plans must be approved by the faculty advisor, the director of the Superintendent Preparation Program Committee, and the certification officer. After completing all the program requirements students are able to register for the TExES Superintendent Exam (064).

 

III. Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Administration

         The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree program in Educational Leadership and Administration offers students opportunities to develop the added knowledge, skills, and experiences necessary for leadership roles in educational settings. Typically, graduates of the doctoral program prepare for positions in three general career areas: 1) Central office and school site leadership, 2) Leadership in higher education and other educational settings, and 3) Leadership in educational policy and evaluation. Unique program features are: emphasis on educational leadership issues in the U.S. - Mexican border with opportunities for research in this cultural and linguistically diverse region, and a cohort program which provides a sense of community and mutual support during students’ doctoral experiences.

 

Requirements for Admission

Admission to the program is based on a variety of factors, including academic achievement, the probability of success in performing doctoral level work, and perceived fit with the cohort experience. The following criteria are considered: a) Written Letter of Intent, b) Curriculum Vitae/Resume, c) Letters of Recommendation, d) Statement of Personal Beliefs, e) Transcripts, f) Graduate Record Exam (GRE), g) Completion of a Master’s Degree, h) Faculty Interview.

 

Completion of a Master’s Degree: Students entering the doctoral program should have completed a master’s degree in educational administration or leadership, or an equivalent field. In cases where the degree was not in the field of educational administration or leadership, students may be required to enroll in master’s level courses and other learning experiences as determined by the program faculty advisor. Courses required to remove deficiencies or meet prerequisites will not count toward meeting doctoral degree credit-hour requirements. These requirements must be met before permission will be granted to enroll in the doctoral core courses.

 

Selection of Doctoral Students: Applicants who consistently demonstrate potential for success throughout the application process may be accepted to the Ed.D. program. Admission to the program is competitive. The number of applicants commonly exceeds the faculty resources available to provide an appropriate level of academic support for each new and continuing student. As a result, it is often necessary to deny admission to otherwise qualified applicants.

 

Pre-Admission Course-Taking: Students are discouraged from taking courses prior to admission to the program and are cautioned that doing so will not be a factor in doctoral program admission decisions. If students, nevertheless, wish to take courses, they may not take core courses or research methods courses. No more than six semester credit hours of work may be transferred from other universities or from UTEP for credit toward the doctoral degree.

 

Application Process: The admission application deadline is March 15. The selection of cohort members is completed by April 15. Application materials should be sent to two different offices: the Graduate School, and the Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations.

 

Graduate School (Application Evaluator; Academics Services Bldg. Room 223;  915-747-5491):

  • Graduate School Admissions Application (You may apply on-line at www.utep.edu/graduate/)
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework completed
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytic Writing scores. To schedule the GRE, call the GRE Center at (800) 473-2255 or the Prometric Center in El Paso at (915) 842-7500.
  • Application fee
  • TOEFL exam required for international students

 

Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations (Education Bldg. Room 501; Phone: 915-747-5300) / Fax: (915-747-5838):

  • Letter of intent
  • Curriculum vitae/resume
  • Typed, double-spaced statement of personal beliefs regarding educational leadership, which includes short and long-term career goals and aspirations (maximum 1,500 words)
  • Three letters of reference that focus on applicant’s achievements, leadership ability and aptitude for graduate study
  • Any additional information (publications, papers submitted in graduate courses, etc.) that may enhance the application

For further information about the program, see the Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations website, http://edleadership.education.utep.edu/

 

Degree Program Requirements

Credit Hour Requirements: The minimum credit hour requirement is 60 semester credit hours beyond the Master’s degree. Students may be required to take additional courses to address particular specialization interests. Minimum credit hours shall be distributed in the following way:

  • Doctoral Core Courses (18 credit hours)
  • Specialization Area Courses (12 credit hours) and
  • Electives (6 credit hours)
  • Research Design and Methodology Courses (12 credit hours)
  • Field-Based Learning (3 credit hours)
  • Capstone Course (3 credit hours)
  • Dissertation (6 credit hours)

 

Doctoral Core (18 credit hours): The doctoral program core consists of six courses: EDAD 6300 Introduction to Doctoral Program; EDAD 6301 Historic and Philosophical Foundations of Education; EDAD 6304 Seminar on Organizational Theory and Development; EDAD 6306 Seminar in Decision Making and Problem Solving in Education; EDAD 6310 Evaluation, Accountability, and Policy Analysis Models; and POLS 6303 Seminar in Cultural, Linguistic, and Political Borders. These courses are offered as follows: one in the summer session of the year of admission, two courses in the fall and spring semesters respectively, and one in the summer session of the following year. Students are required to take the six core courses during the first year of academic studies. First year students may not take an additional course during a semester in which they drop a core course.

 

Transfer of Credits: No more than six semester credit hours of work may be transferred from other universities or from UTEP for credit toward the doctoral degree. Transfer of credit is subject to approval by the Doctoral Program Committee. Transfer courses must be post-master’s, not for a specialist’s degree, and must fit well with the program, as determined by the Committee.

 

Specialization Area Courses (12 credit hours): After the completion of the core, students -with guidance and approval from their Faculty Advisor and the Director of the Doctoral Program Committee- will identify a program area of specialization in their doctoral work and select courses related to this area.

 

Electives (6 credit hours): Additionally, students select two courses within the department or from other academic units of the university, which will add to their specialization area. Educational Leadership and Foundations courses must be at the level of 5380 or higher. Other UTEP courses must be at the 5300 level or higher. Courses taken to attain prior academic degrees are not accepted as electives.

 

Research Design and Methodology Courses (12 credit hours): Students enroll in twelve hours of course work in the areas of quantitative and qualitative research design and methodology: EDRS 6302 Educational Research Methods; EDRS 6315 Qualitative Research Methods I; EDRS 6318 Quantitative Research Methods I; and 3 hours from: EDRS 6316 Qualitative Research Methods II and EDRS 6319 Quantitative Research Methods II. These courses help students develop the skills and knowledge needed to carry out effective independent research during the dissertation phase of the doctoral program.

 

Field-Based Learning (3 credit hours): Students enrolled in the program are expected to complete three semester credits in field-based learning activities which are designed to provide opportunities for practical application of the theoretical concepts acquired in core and elective courses. Take note that EDAD courses completed as part of an earlier master’s or certification program cannot be transferred into the doctoral program.  The two courses which may satisfy this requirement are: 1) EDAD 6350 Internship in Leadership or 2) EDAD 5389 School Superintendent Internship.

 

Capstone Doctoral Course (3 credit hours): All doctoral students, prior to developing a formal proposal or beginning work on the dissertation, will be required to take EDAD 6380 Capstone Doctoral Seminar. This culminating course must be taken in the last semester of doctoral coursework and prior to EDAD 6398 Dissertation Research. The Capstone Doctoral Course takes the place of the Qualifying/Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the course advances students to doctoral candidacy. The course is aimed at ensuring that students are fully prepared to begin work on the dissertation and are able to demonstrate a range of skills and abilities, including an ability to frame a dissertation research question; undertake a thorough, focused literature review; make a decision regarding the type of research design that makes sense given the question; and define the type of data analyses that make possible the reaching of certain conclusions.

 

Dissertation: After successful completion of EDAD 6380 Capstone Doctoral Seminar and advancement to candidacy, students take EDAD 6398 Dissertation Research and EDAD 6399 Dissertation Writing.

 

Advising and Assessment of Students

The Doctoral Program Committee is vested with the responsibility of making key decisions regarding the doctoral program and related issues. Among the issues to be decided by the Doctoral Program Committee are: assignment of first year Faculty Mentors and Program Advisors, review of requests to transfer up to six semester hours upon entry into the doctoral program, and approval of dissertation committees. Doctoral faculty support students in three different roles as:

Faculty Mentor: A Faculty Mentor will be assigned to each doctoral student after admission to the program to provide her/him with guidance and support during the first year of study.

 

Program Advisor: A Program Advisor who will assist each student in preparing and carrying out a doctoral plan of study will be identified during the Fall Semester of the second year. The Program Advisor may be the same person as the Faculty Mentor, but does not need to be.

 

Dissertation Committee Member: A student’s dissertation committee will be officially formalized after successful completion of all coursework and of the Capstone Doctoral Seminar and advancement to candidacy. The committee will include at least four faculty members (usually three members of the Doctoral Program faculty and one from outside the department).

 

Degree Plans: A draft of the Preliminary Degree Plan will be prepared by the Faculty Mentor in consultation with the student before the completion of the first year. By the end of the first year of study, a final version of the Preliminary Degree Plan will be prepared and forwarded to the Doctoral Program Committee for review and approval. The Preliminary Degree Plan will then be forwarded to the Graduate School for approval. Once approved, a copy will be sent to the student and the Doctoral Program Committee. Any proposed modification to the approved Preliminary Degree Plan must be approved by the Program Advisor and the Doctoral Program Committee.

 

Interim Review: At the end of the second summer of the program all students, irrespective of whether they have completed all core courses, will be reviewed by the faculty members who taught the Core Courses. This Interim Review will address issues including: progress in the program; course work to date; writing and clarity of conceptual thinking; commitment to the doctoral program; and potential research interests. The review is designed to reveal the doctoral nominee’s academic strengths and weaknesses and the probability of the nominee’s successful completion of the program through the doctoral dissertation.

 

Capstone Course: All doctoral students, prior to developing a proposal or beginning work on the dissertation, will be required to take a Capstone Doctoral Seminar which takes the place of the Qualifying or Comprehensive Examination. Successful completion of the course will advance students to doctoral candidacy. The Doctoral Program Committee will be responsible for the design of the Capstone Seminar and criteria for evaluating student performance in the course. Course design and evaluation criteria will be reviewed and approved by the full faculty.

 

Dissertation

Students may not register for dissertation courses until they have successfully completed the Capstone Doctoral Seminar (EDAD 6380) and advanced to candidacy. The dissertation research course (EDAD 6398) must precede the dissertation writing course (EDAD 6399) and the student cannot enroll in these courses simultaneously. A dissertation is required of every candidate. It must address a topic of educational significance, contribute to scholarship, derive from independent investigation in the major area, and be approved by the Dissertation Committee.

 

Dissertation Committee: The Doctoral Program Committee in consultation with the student will appoint a Dissertation Committee. Committee appointments will take into consideration faculty academic expertise in the student’s specialization area and the Department’s interest in maintaining workload balance among faculty. The Dissertation Committee shall include at least four faculty members (three members of the Doctoral Program faculty and one from outside the department). The Dissertation Committee approves the dissertation proposal, advises the student on the research and writing of the dissertation, and conducts the final dissertation oral examination.

 

Dissertation Proposal: Students work with their Dissertation Committee in planning, designing, and implementing independent scholarly research. They enroll in EDAD 6398 Dissertation Research during this period, and develop a dissertation proposal with their Doctoral Dissertation Committee. Students continue to enroll in EDAD 6398 until the proposal is approved by the Dissertation Committee. Once the dissertation proposal has been approved, the doctoral candidate will enroll in EDAD 6399 Dissertation Writing until the dissertation is completed.

 

Dissertation Defense: A satisfactory final oral defense of the dissertation is required. The Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations will publish the time and place of this examination. College of Education faculty members are encouraged to attend, and the exam is open to all members of the University community and the public. Dissertation Committee members indicate their approval by signing the Dissertation Defense form that is then submitted to the Graduate School. A majority of the Dissertation Committee members must approve the dissertation. The results of the review are then communicated to the student.

 

Graduation: At the beginning of a student’s last semester, she/he must complete a Graduation Application form, have it signed by the Doctoral Dissertation Committee, and submit this form to the Graduate School along with the appropriate diploma fee. Students are strongly encouraged to visit the Graduate School at the beginning of the semester in order to ensure compliance with all required deadlines. Once all program requirements are met, the candidate will be awarded the degree of Doctor of Education.

 

Educational Administration (EDAD)

 

5310   Administrative Leadership (3-0)

An introduction to the roles and functions of the school administrator emphasizing administrative and organizational theory and practice; identifies the primary knowledge, skills, and competencies required to be an effective school administrator. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5311   Curriculum Renewal (3-0)

The course introduces and explores fundamental dimensions of curriculum theory, policy, and practice as these interact, affect, and are influenced by the school organization. The course includes discussion of current pedagogical, theoretical, historical, legislative, and other field-based issues of diverse paradigms in curriculum renewal from a school administrative perspective. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and ERDS 5307 each with a grade of “B” or better and department approval.

 

5312   Instructional Leadership (3-0)

An introduction to the roles and responsibilities of the supervisor or school administrator as an instructional leader; emphasizes systematic classroom observation, evaluation of teaching, and clinical supervision. Prerequisite: EDAD 5310 with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5314   School-Based Budgeting (3-0)

This course provides students with an overview of educational budgeting practices and issues, with a primary emphasis on school sites. The course includes an introduction to the planning, cost-effectiveness, and resource allocation issues that arise in the educational budgeting process. Students also have opportunities to consider the equity consequences of the budgeting process, as well as the relationship between educational goals and associated resource allocation decisions. Course readings, assignments, and activities encourage students to develop a conceptual understanding of site-based budgeting and practical skills to participate in the budget development process. Prerequisite: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5340   School Community Leadership (3-0)

Treats interpersonal relations and human variables in groups and formal organizations with special emphasis on schools and organizations; identifies strategies for the school principal to improve work group effectiveness. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310 and EDAD 5312 each with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5342   Educational Law (3-0)

An introduction to the federal and state legal systems including constitutional provisions, federal and state regulations, and court decisions affecting public education; includes student and employee rights and responsibilities, statutory and assumed authority of school boards, relations with employee organizations, civil liability of school personnel, and elements of due process. Prerequisites: EDRS 5306, EDAD 5310, and EDAD 5312.

 

5345   Educational Leadership in a Diverse Society (3-0)

Overview and systematic application of essential qualitative inquiry skills appropriate for use by school leaders to investigate issues of inclusion and diversity and generate effective curricular, instructional and administrative policies and practices. Prerequisite: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5346   Educational Program Planning and Evaluation (3-0)

Opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills, and competencies required to plan and manage regular and special school programs; includes policy formulation, goal setting, and evaluation emphasizing data-based management systems; requires field-based component. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310 and EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5348   Administration of School Personnel and Services (3-0)

Emphasizes school management tasks and responsibilities related to certified and non-certified staff including position descriptions, recruitment, selection, assignment, and compensation; treats EEO regulations, due process, grievance handling, and other legal requirements including collective bargaining. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “C” or better.

 

5351   Campus Management Methods and Systems Operations (3-0)

This course provides students with opportunities to apply principles of leadership and management relative to the campus physical plant and support systems to ensure a safe and effective learning environment. The course also includes developmental and implementation procedures for crisis planning and for responding to crises along with strategies for addressing student safety during campus security concerns and emergencies. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340, and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “B” or better.

 

5352   Integrative Seminar in Instructional Leadership and Professional Development (3-0)

This course is designed to introduce prospective school leaders to the interconnections among major improvement initiatives while enhancing the role of campus administration whereby instructional leaders must seek continuous improvement processes designed to meet and exceed state accountability standards. The course incorporates state-mandated and school district required Instructional Leadership Development (ILD) training and Professional Development and Appraisal Systems (PDAS) training modules. (Maymester/Wintermester) Prerequisites: EDAD 5310, EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340 and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “B” or better.

 

5365   Directed Individual Study (0-0-3)

Area of study will be designated. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5370   Graduate Workshop in Educational Administration and Supervision (0-0-6)

Selected topics for graduate students, supervisors, and school administrators in such areas as grant writing, school discipline, computer utilization, and other special problems. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: EDAD 5310, and EDAD 5312, EDAD 5340 and EDRS 5307 each with a grade of “B” or better.

 

5375   School Management Internship I (1-0-4)

First half of a two-course sequence including planned field experience and seminars for the Professional Principal Certification candidate; field experience includes working with a fully certified cooperating administrator in elementary, middle, and high school settings under the supervision of a university professor; includes administration of special programs, community education programs, student services, discipline management, scheduling, budgeting, and school business management. Prerequisites: Department approval.

 

5376   School Management Internship II (1-0-4)

Continuation of EDAD 5375. Prerequisites: EDAD 5375 and department approval.

 

5380   School Organization, Reform and Renewal (3-0)

Describes systems, cultural and community of learner approaches to the school organization; emphasizes institutionalization of organization development in school districts and essential competencies for organization reform and renewal. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5382   Educational Finance (3-0)

Basic concepts of the economics of education; uses the systems approach to analyze the issues of equity and equality in educational resource allocation and distribution; includes current Texas state funding policies. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5384   Educational Facilities Management (3-0)

Identifies the knowledge, skills, and competencies required of the school administrator to manage educational facilities; includes population projections and needs assessments, planning, developing educational specifications, site selection, capital outlay, and costs; covers rehabilitating existing buildings, maintenance and operations, and equipment management. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5385   Ethics of Leadership in Education (3-0)

This course examines classic to contemporary works in philosophy, political science, history, literature, and other disciplines in an attempt to understand the importance of ethics and to imbue the value and necessity of ethical principles in our educational leaders. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5386   Educational Policy Development (3-0)

Treats the techniques of describing and selecting among alternative problem solutions based on quantifiable predictions; application to both general and specific educational issues including socio-political factors. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5387   Higher Education Policy Analysis (3-0)

The course investigates the predominant theoretical and practitioner works in higher education policy research. The course provides a foundation for the critical analysis of postsecondary educational policy and the policy-making process. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5388   Central Office Administration (2-0-2)

Critical aspects of central office administration including personnel, programs, budget, planning, evaluation, school board relations, state and federal influences, and general administration of a school district; field experience required. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5389   School Superintendent Internship (1-0-4)

Planned field experience and seminars for the Professional School Superintendent Certificate candidate; field experience includes working with a fully certified cooperating administrator in school and central office settings under the supervision of a university professor; includes consideration of problems relating to overall school district operations. Prerequisites: Completion of all other course work required for the Superintendent Certificate and department approval.

 

5390   Introduction to Higher Education (3-0)

This course introduces students to the organization of higher education institutions, including two-and four-year colleges and universities. Students will explore the history and philosophy of higher education along with exposure to some of the main issues in higher education including governance, politics, finance and relationships with various constituent groups. Students will develop an understanding of the background, growth, purposes, and practices of higher education in the United States. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5391   History of Higher Education (3-0)

This course will examine historical trends in higher education that have affected faculty, staff, students, and trustees in terms of traditions, customs, values, and practice. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5392   The Community College (3-0)

This course provides a historical overview of the development of American community colleges. The course focuses on the social forces leading to the community college movement, educational philosophies, and multiple institutional missions. The roles and responsibilities of leaders in meeting the needs of diverse populations will be emphasized. Particular attention will be paid to the organizational structures and processes that shape administrative decision making and educational leadership. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5393   Higher Education Law (3-0)

This course will emphasize the legal environment of postsecondary education legal processes, and analysis of problems incurred in the American system of higher education. This course will also examine past and present legal precedence as established by state, federal, and supreme courts. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5394   Higher Education Governance (3-0)

The purpose of this course is to expose the student to the literature on management of higher education institutions. This course will help future higher education leaders understand the distinctive organization and behavioral features of colleges and universities, and use this knowledge to better manage and lead their institutions. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5395   Politics of Higher Education (3-0)

This course will examine the politics of educational organizations and leadership. It is designed for the educational leader and researcher who deal with the impact of political action on managing and leading educational institutions. It provides an introduction to the field of educational politics with special emphasis on theoretical and conceptual analysis of the political behavior of education’s stakeholders. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5396   Higher Education Finance (3-0)

This course will provide an overview of the economics and financing of postsecondary education in the United States. It will include an introduction to economic theory as applied to institutions of higher learning, financial trends in funding America’s college and universities, federal investments in higher education, tuition and fee trends, and state policy and budgeting processes. The course will briefly review the basic elements of fiscal management at the institutional level. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5397   Student Development Theory (3-0)

The purpose of this course is to examine a range of human development theories that offer insight into processes of student learning, growth, and development during the college years. Special focus will be directed toward understanding the implications of these theories for and practice of education in general and student affairs in particular. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5398   Thesis Research (0-0-3) Preparation of master thesis proposal. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

5399   Thesis Writing (0-0-3) Writing of master thesis. Prerequisites: EDAD 5398 with a grade of “B” or better and Department approval.

 

6300   Introduction to Doctoral Program (3-0-0)

An orientation to the doctoral program in educational leadership, its values and academic expectations. Introduces students to dominant research traditions in education and the need for and nature of conceptual frameworks in the scholarly process. Students engage in conversation with program faculty regarding their areas of research interests and expertise, and are introduced to the structure and policies of the program. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program and department approval.

 

6301   Historic and Philosophical Foundations of Education (3-0)

This course is organized around four central themes: 1) the moral dimensions of teaching and enculturation of the young in a democracy; 2) problems of access to knowledge; 3) the notion of pedagogical nurturing; and 4) the stewardship of schools in educative communities. Key readings include selections from Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, and Goodlad. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6304   Organizational Theory and Development (3-0)

This course focuses on change and reform in education and the theories and professional practices used to create organizational change. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6306   Seminar in Decision-Making and Problem Solving in Education (3-0)

Students will examine and conduct research about decision-making processes from the perspectives of educational institutions at local, state, and national levels. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6307   Advanced Legal and Ethical Aspects of Leadership (3-0)

This course examines the legal and ethical issues that face educational leaders, including responsibilities, accountability, the public interests, and professionalism. Students will also analyze and synthesize the judicial interpretations of constitutions, statutes, rules, and regulations, and the common law with special focus on individual student's interests. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6308   State and Local Educational Finance Policies (3-0)

Examination of research, as well as theoretical and practical foundations of economic and social accountability in educational organizations. Students will conduct comparative analyses of state educational finance policies, with emphasis on the relationships between the principles of accountability, adequacy, equity, and quality. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6309   Seminar in Educational Leadership (3-0)

Focus on alternative leadership styles and theories of leadership. Students will learn how to assess their own basic and preferred leadership styles. Each student will be encouraged to develop a personal growth plan in educational leadership. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6310   Evaluation, Accountability, and Policy Analysis Models (3-0)

Students will learn to use appropriate multiple indicators and analytic frameworks for documenting, measuring, and evaluating changes in educational policy and practice. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6312   Educational Leadership in Metropolitan Areas (3-0)

This course examines the social, economic, and political characteristics of urban communities and the relationship of education to social settings. The role of leadership, interest groups, and pressure groups are examined, as is the conversion processes and conflict resolution in a context of large, complex urban/minority school districts and the creation of alternative delivery systems. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6313   Administration of Categorical Programs (3-0)

This course examines the leadership roles in securing, administering, and evaluating categorical programs, sponsored projects, and grants. Guest lecturers will include directors of large projects. Team-taught. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6321   Multicultural Diversity in Educational Leadership (3-0)

Students will examine the impact of multicultural pluralism and diversity and how these concepts and practices impact leadership and administration in educational settings. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6340      Administrative Implications from Cognitive Psychology and Learning Theory (3-0)

Implications from cognitive psychology and learning theory for students learning in multicultural diverse urban contexts of schooling. The course examines classical and contemporary learning theories as they affect program changes in schools and other educational settings. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6350   Internship in Leadership (0-0-3)

With the joint guidance of a university faculty member and a practicing leader/administrator in an educational setting, students will be provided opportunities for supervised research and decision-making in a professional setting. Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate Advisor.

 

6351   Internship in Leadership II (0-0-3)

The second semester of internship will provide continuation of supervised research and decision-making in a professional setting. Prerequisite: EDAD 6350 or permission of the graduate advisor.

 

6365   Directed Individual Study (0-0-3)

Area of study will be designated. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6370   Graduate Workshop in Educational Leadership and Administration (3-0)

Selected topics for doctoral students in areas related to Central Office Leadership; School-site Leadership; Leadership in Other Educational Settings; or Leadership in Evaluation, Assessment, and Technology. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

 

6380   Capstone Doctoral Seminar (3-0-0)

This seminar is designed to ensure that students are fully prepared to begin work on the dissertation and are able to demonstrate a range of academic skills and abilities, including an ability to: frame a dissertation research question; undertake a thorough, focused literature review; make a decision regarding the type of research design that makes sense given the question; define the type of data analyses that make possible the reaching of conclusions. Prerequisite: Completion of program coursework and department approval.

 

6398   Dissertation Research (0-0-3)

Under the direction of their Dissertation Committee Chair, students will prepare a dissertation proposal.  Continuous registration is required until the proposal is approved by the Dissertation Committee. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral candidacy, permission of Dissertation Committee Chair, and department approval.

 

6399   Dissertation Writing (0-0-3)

Students, under the direction of the Dissertation Committee Chair, will write a dissertation. Continuous registration in EDAD 6399 is required until the dissertation has been successfully defended and is accepted by the Dissertation Committee. Prerequisites: EDAD 6398 and department approval.

 

Educational Research and Statistics (EDRS)

 

5305   Educational Research and Statistics (3-0)

First of a two-course sequence to develop interrelated concepts and skills of research methods, experimental design in education, and statistical methods; includes computer applications and required computer laboratory; requires development of a formal research proposal.

 

5306   Qualitative Research (3-0)

An introduction to qualitative research, showing when it is appropriate, what research questions it answers, and how to go about designing, carrying out, analyzing, interpreting, and writing up qualitative research. A practice research project is included. Prerequisite: EDRS 5305 with a grade of "C" or better.

 

5307   Data Based Decision Making (3-0)

Application of quantitative data analysis techniques for the examination of national, state and local data bases to guide school level decision making. Emphasis upon evidence based decision making, data analysis and data display for various school stakeholders.

 

6302   Educational Research Methods (3-0)

An overview of the assumptions and requirements of quantitative, qualitative and mixed research methodologies prevalent in educational research. Specific focus will include the appropriate use and design of surveys, experimental and non-experimental designs, measurement and sampling, case studies, ethnography, and historical studies. Prerequisite: Department approval.

 

6315   Qualitative Research Methods I (3-0)

Students will examine qualitative and ethnographic research methods, including participant observation and open-ended interviewing to address problems of educational organizations. Prerequisites: EDRS 6302 with a grade of “B” or better and department approval.

 

6316   Qualitative Research Methods II (3-0-0)

Building on qualitative research methodology, and ethnographic methods, this class will explore the variations and complexity of qualitative methods in addressing problem solving in educational settings. Prerequisites: EDRS 6315 with a grade of “B” or better and department approval.  

 

6318   Quantitative Research Methods I (3-0)

This course provides examination of descriptive and inferential statistics characteristic of quantitative educational research. Topics include: measures of dispersion, standard deviation, probability, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Concepts and ideas will be introduced through lectures, seminars, and review of readings. Prerequisites: EDRS 6302 with a grade of “B” or better and department approval.

 

6319   Quantitative Research Methods II (3-0)

This course provides examination of advanced statistical methods associated with parametric and nonparametric research designs. Focus will include examination of hierarchical linear modeling, structural equation modeling, and the analysis of cross-classified categorical data (loglinear and logit models). Concepts and ideas will be introduced through lectures, seminars, and review of readings. Prerequisites: EDRS 6318 with a grade of “B” or better and department approval.